Pandora Report: 9.14.2018

Happy Friday fellow biodefense gurus – we’re happy to have you read our weekly report on all things from anthrax to Zika.

George Mason Global Health Security Ambassadors Program
The Schar Biodefense program is excited to announce an opportunity for two current biodefense students (MS or PhD) to attend the  5th Annual Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) Ministerial Meeting in Bali, Indonesia from November 6-8, 2018. The GHSA Ministerial Meeting provides an unparalleled opportunity to share experiences and engage in meaningful discussions on global health security with senior government officials from the GHSA member states and implementing partners from civil society and the private sector. One of the main goals of this year’s summit is to launch the GHSA 2024 Framework to guide GHSA members and partners in their collective effort to tackle current and future global health security issues. Therefore the theme of this year’s meeting is Advancing Global Partnerships. The two lucky biodefense students will participate in the meeting as members of a delegation representing the Next Generation Global Health Security Network which is led by Dr. Jamechia Hoyle. The Biodefense program is grateful to Dr. Hoyle and Dean of the Schar School, Mark Rozell, for providing this opportunity. If you’re interested in attending, please make sure to reference the email that was sent out on Friday as this opportunity is only available for current GMU Biodefense MS/PhD students. 

South Korean Man Infected With MERS
South Korea’s preparedness against MERS is being tested again as a man hospitalized in Seoul has tested positive for MERS following a trip to Kuwait. “‘As far as found by now, 20 people including flight attendants and medical staff have been in close contact with the patient and they are under isolation at home,’ KCDC director Jeong Eun-kyeong told a press briefing. The patient, who was suffering from diarrhea, headed directly to Samsung Medical Center from the airport, Jeong said. He is now in an isolation ward at Seoul National University Hospital. The KCDC director said all flights from Middle East countries have been put into quarantine. ‘The KCDC and local governments will do our best to prevent spread of the MERS,’ Jeong noted.” The last time South Korea experienced a MERS case, in 2015, a significant outbreak occurred due to poor infection control and hospital practices. A recent update found that the number of contacts was higher, at 21 people, all of whom are being monitored and are currently asymptomatic.

GMU Biodefense Master’s Open House
Next Thursday, September 20th, is your chance to learn about Schar School’s MS in Biodefense. Located in Arlington, this is a great chance to learn about the program requirements, curriculum, and how you can study biodefense online or in person! The session will provide an overview of our master’s degree programs, an introduction to our world-class faculty and research, and highlights of the many ways we position our students for success in the classroom and beyond. Our admissions and student services staff will be on hand to answer your questions.

Medical Countermeasures: Mission, Method, and Management
The latest issue of AJPH focuses on medical countermeasures (MCMs) and future innovations. “Medical countermeasures (MCMs) are critical for minimizing morbidity and mortality in the event of a large-scale public health emergency. MCMs involve a broad spectrum of medical assets, including biological products and personal protective equipment. Whether the emergency results from a chemical, biological, radiological, or natural disaster or from widespread infectious disease and contagions, a well-prepared public health community will readily access and deploy lifesaving MCMs. Ensuring appropriate distribution and dispensing of MCMs can be logistically complex, but coordinated planning between local, state, and federal agencies facilitates an efficient public health response.” The issue includes articles on MCM history, lessons learned by rapid deployment force 3, planning considerations, Taiwan’s annual seasonal flu mass vaccination program, etc.

ABSA International Call for Abstracts
“ABSA International announces the CALL FOR ABSTRACTS for posters for the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) 5th International Biosafety & Biocontainment Symposium to be held February 11-14, 2019, in Baltimore, Maryland. We are anticipating over 200 attendees and over 30 vendors showcasing the latest biosafety and biocontainment products and services. ABSA International is pleased to offer funding support to help selected students and young professionals* (see definition at end of announcement) to attend the symposium. The selection will be made by a panel of judges who will evaluate the submitted abstracts and identify the top submissions. In addition, ABSA International/USDA ARS will present a Student and Young Professional Poster Award* and a Professional Poster Award for the best posters in the categories listed below. The awards will be announced during the reception on Wednesday, February 13th.”

Responding to Airline Outbreaks – A Hidden Safety Net
Helen Branswell lifts back the curtain on the hidden safety net we have regarding ports of entry and infectious diseases. The Emirates flight that was quarantined at NYC last week due to reports of 100 passengers becoming sick mid-flight, raised several questions regarding how we respond to such events. “The fact that a rapid and aggressive response involving a number of agencies and response teams could be pulled together so quickly is thanks to work that has been underway to build this safety net since the early 1990s. That’s when a seminal report from the Institute of Medicine — now called the National Academy of Medicine — issued a clarion call of the threat emerging infectious diseases posed to the U.S. Many such incidents happen over the course of any given year, but in most cases, the CDC does not get immediate word that someone who was on a plane had a disease such as active tuberculosis or measles. In those scenarios, the agency or its partners work to track down passengers who might have been at risk.” While the news of such events much be worrisome, it’s nice to know we have a strong response in place.

Releasing Genetically Modified Mosquitoes 
Africa will see its first release of GMO mosquitoes by researchers sometime this year or next, as the government of Burkina Faso granted permission for the experiment. “The release, which scientists are hoping to execute this month, will be the first time that any genetically engineered animal is released into the wild in Africa. While these particular mosquitoes won’t have any mutations related to malaria transmission, researchers are hoping their release, and the work that led up to it, will help improve the perception of the research and trust in the science among regulators and locals alike. It will also inform future releases. Teams in three African countries—Burkina Faso, Mali, and Uganda—are building the groundwork to eventually let loose “gene drive” mosquitoes, which would contain a mutation that would significantly and quickly reduce the mosquito population. Genetically engineered mosquitoes have already been released in places like Brazil and the Cayman Islands, though animals with gene drives have never been released in the wild.” Success isn’t just based off the scientific outcomes of the project, but also the consent of those living in the areas. 10,000 mosquitoes will be released and are not planned to have a lasting impact on the insect population as they have a “sterile male” mutation meaning that they are unable to procreate.

Skin Bacterium Gets Feisty With Antibiotics
Well, maybe not feisty, but the common skin commensal, Staphylococcus epidermis, has recently become resistant to almost all antibiotics and has spread around the world. “The researchers also found that some of the genetic mutations identified in these lineages confer resistance not only to an antibiotic called rifampicin but also to last-resort antibiotics such as vancomycin. Clinical guidelines often recommend co-administering both rifampicin and vancomycin for the treatment of Staphylococcus infections to prevent the development of drug resistance. But the authors’ findings suggest that the combination may instead fuel resistance in S. epidermidis.”

Stories You May Have Missed:

  • Bionic Bug Podcast with Natasha Bajema – Looking for a new podcast where fiction meets reality? Check out Dr. Natasha Bajema’s podcast on the latest tech news. The most recent episodes (19 & 20) discuss gene drive, mosquitoes, exoskeletons, and artificial intelligence!

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