Should I Stay or Should I Go? National Bioterror Emergency Response Preparedness

By Zach Goble

The theme of this ASM Biothreats 2017 symposia was perhaps one of the more noteworthy callings for collaboration among groups. With more than 17 years of experience as the director of Hazardous Materials Emergency Response at the Massachusetts Department of Fire, David Ladd emphasized the need for a unified response when encountering any number of hazards. His slogan during his dialog, “what happens on the left coast, then happens on the right coast”, stressed the importance of initiating and maintaining communication with organizations near and far. No one stays unaffected in the world of today and without the exchange of ideas, experiences, and procedures disasters can have an overwhelming effect.

Rich Ozanich, from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Christina Egan, from the NY Dept. of Health, both echoed that close collaboration is a key factor in response. While Rich laid out the Department of Homeland Security’s framework for “The Onion”, which is a set of procedures to guide first responders in the event of a biothreat incident. The emphasis here was that to be successful the training for such events needs to be coordinated at a local, state, and national level.  Christina detailed the many training programs tailored to biological threat response within Emergency Management Departments specific to various states such as Minnesota and Wisconsin. The message here was that while many great programs exist at the state level, there is not a unified national response to confront CBRN threats with the United States.

David Ladd concluded the panel by presenting a proposed model for National Bioterrorism Response that was submitted by the Interagency Board in January, 2017. In the absence of a nationally recognized system for protecting the nation against bioterrorism, the need for such a system is certainly justified. This document provides a model for bringing together various organizations and departments to create a network of local bioterrorism response teams ready to deploy when the need arises. Models such as these represent steps in the right direction to achieving a unified response in ensuring the public remains safe from biological threats.

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