This Week in DC: Events 12.16.13

Monday, December 16th, 2013
From Incitement to Violence to Conflict Mitigation
Elliot School
9:30 AM

Please join The Elliott School’s International Development Studies Program and Internews, the international media development NGO, for a panel discussion to consider the role of media in conflict: How do we know when atrocities are imminent for a country facing conflict? Does media have the potential to provide early warning of mass violence? Are there media interventions that can work to prevent violence?

Tuesday, December 17th
The al-Shabab Threat After Westgate
Carnegie Endowment
12:00PM

The Somali terrorist group al-Shabab catapulted onto the international stage after its September attack on the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi. The group remains a dynamic and adaptive threat that has confounded efforts to eliminate its influence. A panel of experts on al-Shabab will examine the evolving threat in Somalia and beyond, identifying policy prescriptions for African governments, the United States, and the international community.

Wednesday, December 18th
Iran, Oil, and the Geneva Agreement
Atlantic Council
9:00AM

With the signing of an interim accord providing limited sanctions relief in return for restraints on Iran’s nuclear program, attention has focused on whether Iran will be able to increase its currently depressed oil and natural gas exports and whether multinational oil companies will again be willing to invest in Iran’s energy sector. Meanwhile, the President Hassan Rouhani’s administration is altering Iran’s energy policies in an effort to attract new buyers and investment. The panel will discuss the impact of these changes on Iran’s economy and on world oil supplies and prices.

China’s Re-emergence as a Great Power and Its Role in Regional Security
Brookings
1:00PM

During his recent visit to Beijing, U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden noted that “as China’s economy grows, its stake in regional peace and stability will continue to grow,” and that “China will bear increasing responsibility to contribute positively to peace and security.” While this perspective is not new, it is moving toward the center of other countries’ considerations of China as economic stakes increase and potential sources of instability continue to simmer. On December 18, the Center for East Asia Policy Studies (CEAP) will host a panel discussion featuring Visiting Fellows from China, Japan, and Korea to examine the increasing importance of China in Northeast Asian security, and ways that it might make positive contributions to the region. The discussion will focus on the Korean Peninsula, maritime issues, and perceptions of regional security in China, Japan, Korea, and the United States. After the panel, the speakers will take audience questions.

Webcast: December Cyber Risk Wednesday – Risks and Resilience of the Electrical Sector
Atlantic Council
3:00PM

Please join the Atlantic Council’s Cyber Statecraft Initiative for the next Cyber Risk Wednesday on December 18, 2013 from 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. A moderated discussion featuring: Tom Parker, Chief Technology Officer, FusionX; Neal Pollard, Senior Fellow, Cyber Statecraft Initiative, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council; Gib Sorebo, Chief Cybersecurity Technologist, Leidos.

Friday, December 20th
The U.S. and Saudi Arabia: Is a 70-Year Strategic Alliance on the Rocks?
Hudson Institute
10:00AM

The Obama administration’s outreach to Iran over its alleged nuclear program has Washington’s traditional Middle East allies concerned—perhaps the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia above all. An alliance that began in 1944 when President Roosevelt met with the founder of modern Saudi Arabia, King Ibn Saud, the U.S.-Saudi partnership, despite many ups and downs, has remained a cornerstone interest of both countries for nearly 70 years. Now, however, this bilateral relationship appears suddenly troubled—if if not outright endangered. The White House and the Kingdom have diverged on several key Middle East policies—Syria, Egypt, and most importantly Iran—leading Riyadh to consider other strategic options. Will the partnership survive? Or is it merely taking a new shape, long overdue?

(image: Dell/Flickr)

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